Slow (down) Social media

In the last year I have been sporadic with my content and in taking part of the various communities out there. It wasn’t that I didn’t enjoy it anymore but life happened; a new flat and renovation, busy at work and then going freelance amongst other life events. No matter if you’re a regular user of social media, blogger, a brand or an entrepreneur, it takes a lot of time and effort to build up an online presence and it can sometimes get stressful.

Let’s face it, in the online world it can feel like our individual value/own personal brand is measured in the social media currency. I definitely felt that the longer time passed between I wrote or created content, the more self-doubt I felt. Would anyone really bother looking at it all?

Thankfully there is always a way back if you feel that you have something that you want to share with the world. After all, I believe that we’re constantly redefining ourselves anyway.

Speaking about that have you heard about slow social media? It’s a call for people not to like or share out of reflex but actually taking the time to read the post or article. It means slowing down, paying attention and genuinely engaging with content, not just sharing because it makes you look good or commenting to increase your own following.

One thing is for sure, social media is changing every day. Here’s what I learned from taking a break from from it.

Being clear with my purpose
I think it’s harder to get in touch with your true purpose if you spend a lot of time online, mainly because what starts as inspiration can turn into comparison of your own work to others.

Understanding your true purpose on the other hand is a truly soul searching job or like therapy, as one of my clients have said. In order to formulate what your passions, beliefs and dreams are, I think that it’s helpful to take some time offline, search inside yourself and find other inspiration. Or you might be limiting it to only be a sliver of its full potential.

Shape my own voice and work
Stepping a little bit away has given me chance to focus on what I want to do, without being too influenced about what everyone else is doing. It has allowed me to go deeper into my subject and think about all the different shapes it could take, without fitting it into something that is already out there.

Measure of success
Though this might not be true in the fast approaching future, I still feel that my measure of success should be based on achievements in real life rather than online. I want to have accomplishments that are rooted in skills and not likes and prefer lifetime projects rather than over night successes.

These are my three leanings of what I gained by not letting social media eat my time.

What is your experience with this? Have you stopped using social media for a while and what did you learn? Share your thoughts below.